You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Participating in your community is a fundamental principle of British life.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The fundamental principles of British life include:
- Democracy
- The rule of law
- Individual liberty
- Tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs
- Participation in community life.
Reference: Chapter 1: The values and principles of the UK
2. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Channel Islands and the Isle of Man are part of the UK.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: There are also several islands which are closely linked with the UK but are not part of it: the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.
Reference: Chapter 2: What is the UK
3. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
There is a dragon on the official flag of Wales.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: There is also an official Welsh flag, which shows a Welsh dragon. 
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Union Flag
4. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The 'Restoration' refers to the re-establishment of Catholicism as the official Church in the 17th century.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: In May 1660, Parliament invited Charles II to come back from exile in the Netherlands. He was crowned King Charles II of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. Charles II made it clear that he had 'no wish to go on his travels again'. He understood that he could not always do as he wished but would sometimes need to reach agreement with Parliament. Generally, Parliament supported his policies. The Church of England again became the established official Church. Both Roman Catholics and Puritans were kept out of power.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Restoration
5. Which TWO of the following were British inventions?
A Diesel engine
B Jet engine
C Personal computer
D Television
Correct Answer: Television, Jet engine
Explanation: The television was developed by Scotsman John Logie Baird (1888-1946) in the 1920s. In 1932 he made the first television broadcast between London and Glasgow. The jet engine was developed in Britain in the 1930s by Sir Frank Whittle (1907-96), a British Royal Air Force engineer officer.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Some great British inventions of the 20th century
6. What were TWO important aspects of the Reform Act of 1832?
A It abolished rotten boroughs
B It decreased the power of the monarch.
C It gave women the vote
D It increased the number of people who could vote.
Correct Answer: It increased the number of people who could vote., It abolished rotten boroughs
Explanation: The Reform Act of 1832 had greatly increased the number of people with the right to vote. The Act also abolished the old pocket and rotten boroughs.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The right to vote
7. Which famous leader said the following:'We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the street, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender'?
A Admiral Nelson
B Clement Attlee
C Oliver Cromwell
D Winston Churchill
Correct Answer: Winston Churchill
Explanation: Churchill was the son of a politician and, before becoming a Conservative MP in 1900, was a soldier and journalist. In May 1940 he became Prime Minister. During the War, he made many famous speeches including lines which you may still hear: I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat' Churchill's first speech to the House of Commons after he became Prime Minister, 1940; 'We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender' Speech to the House of Commons after Dunkirk (see below), 1940
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The Second World War
8. The first farmers probably came to Britain from where?
A Nor-west Europe
B North America
C Norway
D South-east Europe
Correct Answer: South-east Europe
Explanation: The first farmers arrived in Britain 6,000 years ago. The ancestors of these first farmers probably came from south-east Europe.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain
9. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
A Formula 1 Grand Prix race is held in Britain every year.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: A Formula 1 Grand Prix event is held in the UK each year and a number of British Grand Prix drivers have won the Formula 1 World Championship.
Reference: A modern, thriving society - Sports - Motor sports
10. What festival is celebrated on the 31st of October?
A Bonfire Night
B Halloween
C Hogmanay
D Valentine's Day
Correct Answer: Halloween
Explanation: Halloween, 31 October, is an ancient festival and has roots in the pagan festival to mark the beginning of winter. Young people will often dress up in frightening costumes to play 'trick or treat'. People give them treats to stop them playing tricks on them. A lot of people carve lanterns out of pumpkins and put a candle inside.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other festivals and traditions
11. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Some people rent land called 'an allotment' where they grow fruit and vegetables.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Some people rent additional land called 'an allotment', where they grow fruit and vegetables.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Gardening
12. What task is associated with National Trust?
A Conversing deep water fish
B Conversing native bird species
C Preserving important buildings and places
D Preserving old aircraft
Correct Answer: Preserving important buildings and places
Explanation: Both are charities that work to preserve important buildings, coastline and countryside in the UK.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest
13. In which modern-day country was the compose George Frederick Handel Born?
A Germany
B Iceland
C Japan
D Russia
Correct Answer: Germany
Explanation: The German-born composer George Frederick Handel (1685-1759) spent many years in the UK and became a British citizen in 1727.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Music
14. Which TWO of the following are famous Paralympians?
A Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson
B Dame Elle MacArthur
C Ellie Simmonds
D Jessica Ennis
Correct Answer: Ellie Simmonds, Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson
Explanation: Ellie Simmonds (1994-) is a Paralympian who won gold medals for swimming at the 2008 and 2012 Paralympic Games and holds a number of world records. ; Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson (1969-) is an athlete who uses a wheelchair and won 16 Paralympic medals, including 11 gold medals, in races over five Paralympic Games.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Notable British sportsmen and women
15. Which of these statements is correct?
A The capital city of Scotland is Edinburgh
B The capital city of Scotland is Glasgow
Correct Answer: The capital city of Scotland is Edinburgh
Explanation: Scotland ; The capital city of Scotland is Edinburgh
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Cities of the UK
16. Which famous religious building has been the coronation church since 1066 and is the final resting place for 17 monarchs?
A St Paul's Cathedral
B Westminster Abbey
C Westminster Cathedral
D York Minster
Correct Answer: Westminster Abbey
Explanation: Westminster Abbey has been the coronation church since 1066 and is the final resting place of 17 monarchs.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Religion - Patron saints' days
17. Which of these is not a Christmas tradition in the UK?
A Decorating houses and trees
B Giving gifts
C Having a barbeque
D Sending cards
Correct Answer: Having a barbeque
Explanation: Christmas is celebrated in a traditional way. People usually spend the day at home and eat a special meal, which often includes roast turkey, Christmas pudding and mince pies. They give gifts, send cards and decorate their houses. Christmas is a special time for children. Very young children believe that Father Christmas (also known as Santa Claus) brings them presents during the night before Christmas Day. Many people decorate a tree in their home.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - The main Christian festivals
18. When were the first professional football clubs formed?
A 10th Century
B 17th Century
C 18th Century
D 19th Century
Correct Answer: 19th Century
Explanation: Football is the UK's most popular sport. It has a long history in the UK and the first professional football clubs were formed in the late 19th century.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Football
19. The national Eisteddfod is a major cultural festival that takes place in which country?
A England
B Northern Ireland
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: Wales
Explanation: The National Eisteddfod of Wales is an annual cultural festival which includes music, dance, art and original performances largely in Welsh. It includes a number of important competitions for Welsh poetry.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Music
20. Sir Anthony Van Dyck was famous as which of the following?
A Actor
B Composer
C Painter
D Sculptor
Correct Answer: Painter
Explanation: Many of the painters working in Britain in the 18th and 17th centuries were from abroad - for example, Hans Holbein and Sir Anthony Van Dyck. British artists, particularly those painting portraits and landscapes, became well known from the 18th century onwards.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Art
21. The Festival of Lights is another name for which of the following?
A Diwali
B Eid ul Adha
C Hannukah
D Vaisakhi
Correct Answer: Diwali
Explanation: Diwali normally falls in October or November and lasts for five days. It is often called the Festival of Lights. It is celebrated by Hindus and Sikhs. It celebrates the victory of good over evil and the gaining of knowledge. There are different stories about how the festival came about. There is a famous celebration of Diwali in Leicester.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other religious festivals
22. Which of these statements is correct?
A Civil servants are politically neutral
B Civil servants have to be politically aligned to the elected government
Correct Answer: Civil servants are politically neutral
Explanation: They are chosen on merit and are politically neutral - they are not political appointees. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The civil service
23. In a Crown Court, who decides what penalty will be, in the case of a 'guilty' verdict?
A A police officer
B A solicitor
C The judge
D The jury
Correct Answer: The judge
Explanation: If the jury finds a defendant guilty, the judge decides on the penalty.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts
24. Official reports of parliamentary proceeding are published in which of the following?
A Hansard
B The BBC magazine
C The Sunday Times
D The Telegraph
Correct Answer: Hansard
Explanation: Proceedings in Parliament are broadcast on television and published in official reports called Hansard.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The media and government