You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. What do you accept and agree to when you become a permanent resident of the UK?
A Catholic beliefs and values
B Protestant beliefs and values
C The right to be tried for crimes in your country of origin
D Traditions of the UK
Correct Answer: Traditions of the UK
Explanation: British society is founded on fundamental values and principles which all those living in the UK should respect and support. These values are reflected in the responsibilities, rights and privileges of being a British citizen or permanent resident of the UK. They are based on history and traditions and are protected by law, customs and expectations.
Reference: Chapter 1: The values and principles of the UK
2. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
In 1588 the English fleet defeated a large French fleet of ships that intended to land an army in England.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Elizabeth became one of the most popular monarchs in English history, particularly after 1588, when the English defeated the Spanish Armada (a large fleet of ships), which had been sent by Spain to conquer England and restore Catholicism.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
3. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Before 1215 there were no laws to limit the power of the king of England.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: There were few formal limits to the king's power until 1215. In that year, King John was forced by his noblemen to agree to a number of demands. The result was a charter of rights called the Magna Carta (which means the Great Charter). The Magna Carta established the idea that even the king was subject to the law.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - Legal and political changes
4. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
In 1707 the kingdoms of England and Scotland were united.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The Act of Union, known as the Treaty of Union in Scotland, was therefore agreed in 1707, creating the Kingdom of Great Britain.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Act or Treaty of Union in Scotland
5. An attempt by which group to put James II's son on the throne instead of George I was quickly defeated?
A English Puritans
B French Huguenots
C Irish Catholics
D Scottish Jacobites
Correct Answer: Scottish Jacobites
Explanation: When Queen Anne died in 1714, Parliament chose a German, George I, to be the next king, because he was Anne's nearest Protestant relative. An attempt by Scottish Jacobites to put James II's son on the throne instead was quickly defeated.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Prime minister
6. Which Scottish poet wrote The Bruce about the Battle of Bannockburn?
A Geoffrey Chaucer
B John Barbour
C John Milton
D Robert Burns
Correct Answer: John Barbour
Explanation: In Scotland, many people continued to speak Gaelic and the Scots language also developed. A number of poets began to write in the Scots language. One example is John Barbour, who wrote The Bruce about the Battle of Bannockburn.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - A distinct identity
7. James II invaded Ireland in an attempt to regain the throne with an army from which country?
A France
B Germany
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: France
Explanation: James II wanted to regain the throne and invaded Ireland with the help of a French army.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Glorious Revolution
8. Which of the following is a famous Stone Age site in the UK?
A Globe Theatre
B Nelson's Column
C Stonehenge
D Windsor Castle
Correct Answer: Stonehenge
Explanation: One of these monuments, Stonehenge, still stands in what is now the English county of Wiltshire.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain
9. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The threat of Viking attack caused the people in the north to unite, and the term Scotland was used to describe that country.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: In the north, the threat of attack by Vikings had encouraged the people to unite under one king, Kenneth MacAlpin. The term Scotland began to be used to describe that country.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Vikings
10. Which TWO are famous UK landmarks?
A Grand Canyon
B Loch Lomond
C Notre Dame
D Snowdonia
Correct Answer: Loch Lomond, Snowdonia
Explanation: Snowdonia is a national park in North Wales. It covers an area of 838 square miles (2,170 square kilometres). Its most well-known landmark is Snowdon, which is the highest mountain in Wales. ; Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park - This national park covers 720 square miles (1,865 square kilometres) in the west of Scotland. Loch Lomond is the largest expanse of fresh water in mainland Britain and probably the best-known part of the park.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern thriving, society - Places of interest - UK landmarks
11. Which TWO are famous gardens in the UK?
A Bodnant Garden
B London eye
C Sissinghurst
D Snowdonia
Correct Answer: Sissinghurst, Bodnant Garden
Explanation: There are famous gardens to visit throughout the UK, including Kew Gardens, Sissinghurst and Hidcote in England,Crathes Castle and Inveraray Castle in Scotland, Bodnant Garden in Wales, and Mount Stewart in Northern Ireland.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Gardening
12. Which TWO of the following are famous British artists?
A Andy Murray
B David Hockney
C Henry Moore
D Sir Edward Elgar
Correct Answer: Henry Moore, David Hockney
Explanation: David Hockney (1937-) was an important contributor to the 'pop art' movement of the 1960s and continues to be influential today. ; Henry Moore (1898-1986) was an English sculptor and artist. He is best known for his large bronze abstract sculptures.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Art - Notable British artists
13. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
A traditional food in Wales is Ulster fry.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Northern Ireland: Ulster fry - a fried meal with bacon, eggs, sausage, black pudding, white pudding, tomatoes, mushrooms, soda bread and potato bread.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Cooking and food - Traditional foods
14. With which sport do you associate Lewis Hamilton, Jensen Button and Damon Hill?
A Athletics
B Football
C Formula 1
D Skiing
Correct Answer: Formula 1
Explanation: A Formula 1 Grand Prix event is held in the UK each year and a number of British Grand Prix drivers have won the Formula 1 World Championship. Recent British winners include Damon Hill, Lewis Hamilton and Jensen Button.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Motor sports
15. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Lake District is England's largest national park
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The Lake District is England's largest national park.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest - UK landmarks
16. The Battle of the Boyne is celebrated with a bank holiday in which country?
A England
B Northern Ireland
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: Northern Ireland
Explanation: In Northern Ireland, the anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne in July is also a public holiday.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Bank holidays
17. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The small claims procedure is an informal way for people to settle minor disputes.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The small claims procedure is an informal way of helping people to settle minor disputes without spending a lot of time and money using a lawyer.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Civil courts - The small claims procedure
18. What important change to our voting rights took place in 1969? 
A Compulsory voting was introduced
B Prisoners were given the vote
C The voting age was reduced to 18 for men and women
D Women over 35 were given the vote
Correct Answer: The voting age was reduced to 18 for men and women
Explanation: In 1969, the voting age was reduced to 18 for men and women.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The development of British democracy
19. Which of these statements is correct?
A In the UK, employers can discriminate against different groups of people.
B UK laws ensure people are not treated unfairly in any area of work or life.
Correct Answer: UK laws ensure people are not treated unfairly in any area of work or life.
Explanation: UK laws ensure that people are not treated unfairly in any area of life or work because of their age, disability, sex, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sexuality or marital status. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Fundamental principles - Equal opportunities
20. Which of these statements is correct?
A Magistrates must be specially trained legal experts who have been solicitors for three years.
B Magistrates usually work unpaid and do not need legal qualifications
Correct Answer: Magistrates usually work unpaid and do not need legal qualifications
Explanation: Magistrates and Justices of the Peace (JPs) are members of the local community. In England, Wales and Scotland they usually work unpaid and do not need legal qualifications. 
Reference: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Criminal Courts - Magistrates' and Justice of the Peace Courts
21. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland each have devolved administrations which give them total control over all policies and laws.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Policy and laws governing defence, foreign affairs, immigration, taxation and social security all remain under central UK government control. However, many other public services, such as education, are controlled by the devolved administrations.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Devolved administrations
22. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
 Life peers in the House of Lords can pass on their title to their first-born child
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: They have usually had an important career in politics, business, law or another profession. Life peers are appointed by the monarch on the advice of the Prime Minister. They also include people nominated by the leaders of the other main political parties or by an independent Appointments Commission for non-party peers.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - The House of Lords
23. Income tax is not paid on which of the following forms of income?
A All of the above
B Benefits
C Money you win on the lottery
D Pension
Correct Answer: Money you win on the lottery
Explanation: People in the UK have to pay tax on their income, which includes:
-wages from paid employment ;
-profits from self-employment ;
-taxable benefits ;
-pensions ;
-income from property, savings and dividends.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Taxation - Income tax
24. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
All MPs represent one of the main political parties.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Each MP represents a parliamentary constituency, which is a small area of the country. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - The House of Commons