You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. What TWO freedoms are offered by the UK to citizens and permanent residents?
A A right to a fair trial
B Free groceries for everyone
C Freedom of speech
D Long lunch breaks on Friday
Correct Answer: Freedom of speech, A right to a fair trial
Explanation: In return, the UK offers:
- freedom of belief and religion
- freedom of speech
- freedom from unfair discrimination
- a right to a fair trial
Reference: Chapter 1: The values and principles of the UK
2. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Isle of Man is a Crown dependency
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: There are also several islands which are closely linked with the UK but are not part of it: the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. These have their own governments and are called 'Crown dependencies'.
Reference: Chapter 2: What is the UK
3. Which of these statements is correct?
A Elizabeth I had very good relations with Parliament.
B Elizabeth I handled parliament very badly during her reign.
Correct Answer: Elizabeth I had very good relations with Parliament.
Explanation: Elizabeth I was very skilled at managing Parliament. During her reign, she was successful in balancing her wishes and views against those of the House of Lords and those of the House of Commons, which was increasingly Protestant in its views.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The rise of the Parliament
4. Which TWO are English Civil war battles? 
A Hastings
B Marston Moor
C Naseby
D Waterloo
Correct Answer: Marston Moor, Naseby
Explanation: The king's army was defeated at the Battles of Marston Moore and Naseby.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Oliver Cromwell and the English republic
5. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Reformation failed in Scotland and the country remained Strongly Catholic.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Scotland had also been strongly influenced by Protestant ideas. In 1560, the predominantly Protestant Scottish Parliament abolished the authority of the Pope in Scotland and Roman Catholic religious services became illegal.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Reformation in Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots
6. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Norman French influenced the development of the English language as we know today.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The Middle Ages saw the development of a national culture and identity. After the Norman Conquest, the king and his noblemen had spoken Norman French and the peasants had continued to speak Anglo-Saxon. Gradually these two languages combined to become one English language.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - A distinct identity
7. The Victorian period famously saw reformers leading moves to improve conditions for which section of society?
A The aristocracy
B The clergy
C The middle classes
D The poor
Correct Answer: The poor
Explanation: Within the UK, the middle classes became increasingly significant and a number of reformers led moves to improve conditions of life for the poor.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Victorian Age
8. During the 18th century, Britain fought a number of wars with which country?
A France
B India
C South Africa
D Spain
Correct Answer: France
Explanation: During the 18th century, Britain fought a number of wars with France.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - War with France
9. The Elizabethan period in England was a time of growing patriotism. What do we mean by this?
A A feeling of pride in being English
B The country became democratic
C The monarchy became unpopular
D There was unrest and instability
Correct Answer: A feeling of pride in being English
Explanation: The Elizabethan period in England was a time of growing patriotism: a feeling of pride in being English.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Exploration, poetry and drama
10. Which of these statements is correct?
A During the reign of Charles I, Irish Catholics supported the views of the Puritans.
B During the reign of Charles I, Parliament attempted to take control of the English army following a rebellion in Ireland.
Correct Answer: During the reign of Charles I, Parliament attempted to take control of the English army following a rebellion in Ireland.
Explanation: Another rebellion began in Ireland because the Roman Catholics in Ireland were afraid of the growing power of the Puritans. Parliament took this opportunity to demand control of the English army - a change that would have transferred substantial power from the king to Parliament.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The beginning of the English Civil War
11. Who were the Picts?
A Ancestors of the English people
B Ancestors of the Irish people
C Ancestors of the Scottish people
D Ancestors of the Welsh people
Correct Answer: Ancestors of the Scottish people
Explanation: Areas of what is now Scotland were never conquered by the Romans, and the Emperor Hadrian built a wall in the north of England to keep out the Picts (ancestors of the Scottish people).
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Romans
12. St George is the patron saint of which UK country?
A England
B Northern Ireland
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: England
Explanation: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland each have a national saint, called a patron saint. Each saint has a special day:
-1 March: St David's Day, Wales ;
-17 March: St Patrick's Day, Northern Ireland ;
-23 April. St George's Day, England ;
-30 November: St Andrew's Day, Scotland.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Religion - Patron saints' days
13. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Most people in the UK live in towns and cities
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Most people live in towns and cities but much of Britain is still countryside
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - The nations of the UK
14. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Pantomimes are plays based on fairy stories.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Many theatres produce a pantomime at Christmas time. They are based on fairy stories and are light-hearted plays with music and comedy, enjoyed by family audiences.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Theatre
15. At which festival are mince pies traditionally eaten?
A Christmas
B Diwali
C Easter
D Vaisakhi
Correct Answer: Christmas
Explanation: Christmas is celebrated in a traditional way. People usually spend the day at home and eat a special meal, which often includes roast turkey, Christmas pudding and mince pies.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - The main Christian festivals
16. What do Sir William Golding, Seamus Heaney and Harold Pinter have in common?
A They are all famous British athletes
B They have all been Prime Minister
C They have all been awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.
D They were part of the first British expedition to the North Pole.
Correct Answer: They have all been awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.
Explanation: Several British writers, including the novelist Sir William Golding, the poet Seamus Heaney, and the playwright Harold Pinter, have won the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature
17. Which of these statements is correct?
A Sir Steve Redgrave is a famous film actor who has won several BAFTAs.
B Sir Steve Redgrave is a famous rower who won gold medals in five consecutive Olympics Games.
Correct Answer: Sir Steve Redgrave is a famous rower who won gold medals in five consecutive Olympics Games.
Explanation: Sir Steve Redgrave (1962-) won gold medals in rowing in five consecutive Olympic Games and is one of Britain's greatest Olympians.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sports - Notable British sportsmen and women
18. Since 1927 the BBC has organised which series of famous concerts?
A Aldeburgh Festival
B Glastonbury
C The Eisteddfod
D The Proms
Correct Answer: The Proms
Explanation: The Proms is an eight-week summer season of orchestral classical music that takes place in various venues, including the Royal Albert Hall in London. It has been organised by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) since 1927.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Music
19. Which of these statements is correct?
A All the national saints' days are celebrated but only in England and Wales are they official holidays.
B All the patron saints' days are celebrated but only in Scotland and Northern Ireland are they official holidays.
Correct Answer: All the patron saints' days are celebrated but only in Scotland and Northern Ireland are they official holidays.
Explanation: Only Scotland and Northern Ireland have their patron saint's day as an official holiday (although in Scotland not all businesses and offices will dose).
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Religion - Patron saints' days
20. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The 40 days before Easter are known as Lent.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The 40 days before Easter are known as Lent.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and Traditions - The main Christian festivals
21. Which of the following countries did not help set up the EEC?
A Belgium
B Germany
C Ireland
D Luxembourg
Correct Answer: Ireland
Explanation: The European Union (EU), originally called the European Economic Community (EEC), was set up by six western European countries (Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and the Netherlands) who signed the Treaty of Rome on 25 March 1957. The UK originally decided not to join this group but it became a member in 1973. There are now 27 EU member states (see table below). Croatia will also become a member state in 2013.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The European Union
22. Which of these statements is correct?
A Members of the House of Lords are not elected by the people.
B Members of the House of Lords are voted in by members of the House of Commons.
Correct Answer: Members of the House of Lords are not elected by the people.
Explanation: Members of the House of Lords, known as peers, are not elected by the people and do not represent a constituency. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - The House of Lords
23. What sorts of cases do Crown Court and Sheriff Courts deal with?
A Minor criminal cases
B Serious offences
C Small claims procedures
D Youth cases
Correct Answer: Serious offences
Explanation: In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, serious offences are tried in front of a judge and a jury in a Crown Court. In Scotland, serious cases are heard in a Sheriff Court with either a sheriff or a sheriff with a jury. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the court - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts
24. Which of the following is a core value of the civil service?
A Bribery
B Integrity
C Laziness
D Party loyalty
Correct Answer: Integrity
Explanation: Civil servants are expected to carry out their role with dedication and a commitment to the civil service and its core values. These are: integrity, honesty, objectivity and impartiality (including being politically neutral). 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The civil service